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1873

  • Eight-hour working day (48 hour week) gradually established in South Australia.
  • Adelaide Oval opened.
  • William Christie Gosse was appointed to lead a government expedition to explore between the Overland Telegraph Line at Alice Springs and Perth. At the same time Ernest Giles and Peter Egerton Warburton were in the field on similar expeditions.

For more information see The Foundation of South Australia: 1852-1883, key events and issues and Discovery of Ayers Rock (Uluru): diary 19 July 1873.

Uluru (Ayers Rock)
Title : Uluru (Ayers Rock) Uluru (Ayers Rock)
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Creator : Berry, Edwin S.
Source : D6994(L)
Date of creation : 1873
Additional Creator : Gosse, William Christie,
Format : Artwork
Contributor : State Library of South Australia
Catalogue record
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Description :

Edwin Berry's drawing is of the end facing of Uluru (Ayers Rock), rather than the length-wise aspect, usually depicted. Matching Gosse's description of the landform as having a most peculiar appearance, Berry captures the unusual shape and also defines the caves in the upper face. Berry was second-in-command on the central Australia expedition and also produced the expedition map as well as a number of others, including items for J.W. Lewis's 1874 expedition to Lake Eyre and a town planning map for Palmerston, Northern Territory, 1870. He was later made Chief Draftsman in the Land Titles Office in Adelaide.


William Christie Gosse led the South Australian Government funded expedition west from Alice Springs in 1873. Its purpose was to explore a possible route to Western Australia. With five men, three Afghan cameleers and an Aboriginal boy, the expedition explored west until repelled by sand hills and spinifex. Gosse discovered and named Ayers Rock on 19 July 1873 and in addition the Musgrave Ranges and Mount Woodroffe, the highest point in South Australia (1435 metres). He mapped some 60,000 miles of new country.

Subjects
Related names :

Berry, Edwin S.

Gosse, William Christie, 1842-1881

Coverage year : 1873
Period : 1852-1883
Place : Uluru/Ayers Rock (NT)
Region : Northern Territory
Further reading :

Breeden, Stanley Uluru : looking after Uluru-Kata Tjuta the Anangu way East Roseville, N.S.W.: Simon & Schuster Australia, 1994

Gosse, William Christie Report and diary of Mr WC Gosse's central and western exploring expedition 1873 Adelaide: Libraries Board of South Australia, 1973

Kerle, J Anne Uluru, Kata-Tjuta & Watarrka = Ayers Rock, the Olgas & Kings Canyon, Northern Territory Sydney : UNSW Press, 1995

Layton, Robert Uluru: an Aboriginal history of Ayers Rock Canberra: Australian Institute of Aboriginal Studies, 1986

Sweet, IP Uluru & Kata Tjuta: a geological history Canberra: Australian Geological Survey Organisation, 1992

Internet links :
Exhibitions and events :

State Library of South Australia: Mortlock Wing. Taking it to the edge August 2004-


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